Roads and Walls in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

By Associate Professor Jessica Kim   Much of Donald Trump’s campaign rhetoric and policy proposals focus on the closure of borders, the building of walls, and limiting the flow of goods and people across international boundaries. This inflammatory speech belies the deep historical connectedness of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, from migration and employment patterns, to the flow of trade goods and services, to the existence of … Continue reading Roads and Walls in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Thinking About Colonial Photography Through the Photographs of the Menage Expedition to the Philippines

By Professor Mark Rice   How should we make sense of colonial photographs that bridge the divide or blur the lines between different colonial regimes who occupied the same place but at different times? That question is at the heart of my current research project, a project that involves more than 150 photographs taken by two young, white, American men in the Philippines in the … Continue reading Thinking About Colonial Photography Through the Photographs of the Menage Expedition to the Philippines

Researching community and conflict in Preston, Idaho

By Elizabeth Miller It’s 7am and I’m standing in the parking lot of a Cabela’s – a hunting and fishing superstore – in the town of Farmington, Utah. There’s only one car in sight. My Uber driver is a bit concerned leaving me alone with the truck. But I was feeling fairly confident in what I was going to do next. The white pickup truck … Continue reading Researching community and conflict in Preston, Idaho

The Decorated Tenement: Reflections on Looking and Seeing

By Dr. Zachary J. Violette   Sometimes important historical evidence — evidence that can allow us to question dominant narratives — can be hidden in plain sight. It can even be part of our daily lives, so common that it easily escapes our grasp. But it is the fundamental premise of vernacular architecture studies that the built environment encodes meaning for their builders and occupants … Continue reading The Decorated Tenement: Reflections on Looking and Seeing

Founding Stories

By Michael A. McDonnell In his best-selling book, 1776, David McCullough introduced readers to John Greenwood, a patriot fifer who served in Washington’s campaign of 1776. McCullough reported that when the sixteen-year old heard news of the bloodshed at Lexington and Concord, he “set off on foot with little more than the clothes on his back” and walked 150 miles to join the patriot forces. … Continue reading Founding Stories

Sympathy over Structure in ‘The Garies and Their Friends’

By Dr Hannah Murray In April, Ancestry.ca broadcast an advert encouraging Canadians to research their family history. The advert, ‘Inseparable’, set in the antebellum South, features a young Black woman and white man in a clandestine meeting; hoping to escape to the free North, the man implores “there’s a place where we can be together across the border. Will you leave with me?”  This brief … Continue reading Sympathy over Structure in ‘The Garies and Their Friends’

The Republican Party, the Supreme Court, and Competing Anti-Abortion Strategies

By Dr Prudence Flowers In the first quarter of 2019, 28 state legislatures introduced an abortion ban. To date, 9 states have passed laws dramatically limiting when abortion can occur.[1] States such as Alabama banned abortion from the moment of conception, while Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, Kentucky, Georgia, and Louisiana banned abortion from 6-8 weeks gestation (when a fetal heartbeat can first be detected).[2] These bills … Continue reading The Republican Party, the Supreme Court, and Competing Anti-Abortion Strategies

Q&A: W. Fitzhugh Brundage

Sam Watts interviewed historian and long-time friend of ANZASA, W. Fitzhugh Brundage about his latest book, Civilizing Torture: An American Tradition (Harvard University Press, 2018) in May 2019. W. Fitzhugh Brundage is the William B. Umstead Professor of History at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and has also published widely on Civil War and Reconstruction memory, lynching and nineteenth century socialist utopianism in the … Continue reading Q&A: W. Fitzhugh Brundage

A Movement Divided? Incrementalists, Absolutists, and Anti-Abortion Strategy

By Dr Prudence Flowers On 15 May 2019, Alabama Governor Kay Ivey signed into law a measure that bans all abortions from the moment of conception, except in cases where there is a “serious health” risk to the pregnant person. Doctors who perform abortions could be charged with a felony and face a potential 99-year prison sentence. Alabama now has the dubious distinction of having … Continue reading A Movement Divided? Incrementalists, Absolutists, and Anti-Abortion Strategy